Home > Archive of Weekly Assignments > Archive of Weekly Assignments for 2011 > "Photo Essay," 4 - 31 July 2011

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Threshing DaysGoessel, Kansas, Aug 6th
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The end result of the crusades?11) is not likely to be refused. The remaining question: to buy or not to buy?!
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Vine6) When he returned in 1239 he brought back with him the Damascene rose (still cultivated today) and a vine called 'Chardonnay' without which there would be no champagne.
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descent into the depths7) The Benedictine monks of Saint Nicaise in Reims dug out the cellars below the abbey in XIII century (first used as a quarry by the Romans and as a shelter for persecuted Christians in IV century) in which to store the wine they developed from the Chardonnay grapes. To reach the lower levels the visitor descends first to 12 metres below ground (constant temperature 12°C) and to reach the quarry area to 20 metres (constant temperature 10°C).
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Top and tail8)10 million bottles (ranging from 5dl to 15 litres in size!)
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Cellars9) are stored in 4 km of passage ways
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A drink in view10) After the stiff climb back up, the opportunity to taste the precious drink
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Comte de Champagne1)Comte de Champagne (1201-1253) and king of Navarre, known as Thibaud le Posthume is the most renouned of the counts of Champagne.
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mediaeval lord2) He represents the archetype of the mediaeval lord: valiant chevalier and gentleman poet
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